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Friday, January 3, 2014

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New Year's Spelling Mistakes

I find I make two different types of spelling mistakes. There are some words that I always struggle with spelling correctly. Then there are the words that often pop up spelled incorrectly because I made a typo. 

Sometimes in this second group my typos are not caught because they are auto corrected to a similar word. 

If I am making these simple mistakes then I am SURE that my students are also making them!

There are lots of different ways to practice spelling with new vocabulary words, and visuals are a great plus! Check out this infographic to learn the differences yourself or to help your students! 

Spelling words incorrectly while on the job, especially in messages to your boss or students, is a sure way to be embarrassed while you are working. Make 2014 your year to appear more knowledgeable than ever – learn how to spell! It can sometimes be confusing when reading a paper or email that has incorrect spelling or use of possession because even the simplest mistakes can have a great effect on the meaning of a sentence. For example, New Year’s Day is completely different than New Years Day. The first occurs on January 1st of every year and is celebrated all over the world. The latter is what people often use to refer to this day we celebrate, but without the apostrophe indicates it is the day of many new years. Read through the infographic to the right to see a couple of examples of words that are commonly mistaken for others in regards to New Year’s Edition.

Created by DLA Editors, a company providing high-quality document editing and proofreading services

17 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. I am so glad to hear that you like it!

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  2. Nice work. ...thumbs up

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    1. Thanks. I appreciate you enjoyed this :)

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  3. Good way of introducing homonyms also!

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    1. Yes! Great point. Thanks for commenting :)

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  4. This sure will help my students it sure did help me :-)

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    1. Thanks for commenting. It is SO great to hear that you think it will help your students!

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  5. Very nice job and a funny way to correct spelling errors :-) I will visit your page regularly.

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    1. I am glad you thought it was funny :) Thanks for commenting!

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  6. Good advice for both learners and teachers of English.

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  7. What a cool idea! :) Now I need to think of how to correct my student in both witty and helpful way, because he's always writing "let's meat tomorrow", no matter how many times I pointed this out to him. Maybe employing this funny strategy could help? Any humorous ideas concerning 'meat' and 'meet'? :)

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    1. I would do a picture of someone throwing a steak in someone's face, "nice to meat you" vs two people shaking hands, "Nice to meet you"

      As children we were taught to remember you eat mEAT.

      Hope that helps!

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